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Trey Domann Joined The King’s As Vice President

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HOUSTON — The King’s announced that Trey Domann has joined the company as Vice President to provide leadership in the areas of business process, business development and strategic growth.

Trey brings more than 15 years of experience in business development, entrepreneurial strategy, sales, construction, project management, operations, marketing and human resource management to clients of The King’s. Prior to joining The King’s executive team in 2015, he spent the last twelve years partnering, developing and operating healthcare ventures.

Trey graduated from Texas A&M University in 1999 and is a member of the Association for Learning Environments (A4LE), IFMA, TASBO and TAHFM. Trey loves time with his family, fitness, sports, hunting, fishing and music. He is a certified ropes course facilitator, team building instructor, Houston Area Young Life volunteer, and he serves on the board of directors for The Gathering of Men and the Greater Houston Prayer Breakfast.

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90-Day Pilot Up To 86% Air Quality Improvement

Paul Cagle
Best Practices, Success Stories

Case Study: Corporate campus with more than 250,000 sq. ft. Class A office space.

Facility: Campus located in the Houston region with five separate buildings and a total of 10 floors.

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Scientific Study: The original walk-through and indoor air quality (IAQ) test, conducted in March, measured the status of 0.3 micron levels of indoor air particulates. Multiple samples were taken measuring indoor air particulates with testing that is typically deployed in laboratories, clean rooms, pharmacies and hospitals.

Situation: Facility management was concerned about low air quality resulting from 0.3 micron airborne particulates, such as dust, dust mites, dust mite feces, dead skin cells, the H1N1 virus, fungal and mold spores, and many harmful bacteria, known to cause respiratory disorders in approximately 30% of the adult population.

Solution:  The King’s Operation System Pilot

A 90-day pilot of The King’s Operation System (TKOS) began in July and a progress audit was conducted in October. This 90-day pilot involved janitorial staff and supervisors who were graduates of The King’s Training Camp, and who implemented:

  • Cleaning and managing the filtration of our 4-level back pack vacuum system
  • Dusting with microfiber cloths and duster covers on special “wooly dusters”
  • Microfiber flat mops using a double-sided mop bucket system, and
  • Laundering cleaning cloths and mop heads frequently.

Results: The transition to The King’s Operation System was smooth, with benefits realized in the very first week. Over the 90-day pilot, these percentage improvements in parts-per-million of 0.3 micron particles were documented in lobbies and office areas of the five buildings on this campus:

Building 1: 71% to 78%

Building 2: 42% to 57%

Building 3: 84% to 86%

Building 4: 69%

Building 5: 86%

Download PDF for complete test results

Long-term benefits affect the overall real estate investment value. The life expectancy of building assets, such as carpet, hard floor surfaces, paint, computers, servers, etc. is increased.

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Church School Clean for Health

Paul Cagle
Best Practices, Success Stories

Case Study: Church educational wing and child care center.

Facility: Approximately 20,000 sq. ft. two-story education building on church property located in a residential community near Houston.

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Scientific Study: 75-day study on the status of 0.3 micron levels of indoor air particulates. The initial indoor air quality (IAQ) test was conducted in March 2013 and The King’s cleaning for health team began cleaning in April. Progress audit was conducted June 28. Testing equipment used was professional-grade, typical in laboratories, clean rooms, pharmacies, and hospitals. Multiple samples were taken.

After only 75 cleaning days, harmful air particulates down to 0.3 microns were reduced by 87% on the first floor and 88% on the second floor.

Situation: The health of children and their teaching staff is a high priority for church leaders and educators. This congregation was concerned about high levels of 0.3 micron airborne particulates, known to cause or exacerbate respiratory problems, especially among children. Examples of 0.3 micron airborne particulates include: dust, dust mites, dust mite feces, dead skin cells, the H1N1 virus, fungal and mold spores, and many harmful bacteria.

Solution: Over the 75-day period of this study, we implemented The King’s Operation System (TKOS) with particular emphasis on these strategies:

  • Cleaning staff were graduates of the TKOS Training Camp
  • Each cleaning team member was trained as a specialist and provided standardized equipment and materials for their area,
  • Managed filtration on our 4-level filter back pack vacuums,
  • Dusted with microfiber cloths and duster covers,
  • Mopped with microfiber flat mops and double sided mop bucket system, and
  • Laundered cleaning cloths and mop heads at specific frequencies.

Long-term benefits affect the overall real estate investment value. The life expectancy of building assets, such as carpet, hard floor surfaces, paint, computers, servers, etc. is increased.

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Major University Improved Air Quality While Slashing Costs

Paul Cagle
Best Practices, Success Stories

Case Study: Facility department of this university implemented a new cleaning process provided by The King’s, designed to clean for health and eliminate waste.

Facility: Large Midwestern university with more than 4.5 million cleanable square feet.

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Situation: Beginning September 2011, the facility department of this university began cleaning a large academic building with a new cleaning process provided by The King’s, designed to clean for health and eliminate waste. Primary goals were to (1) clean for health first and then appearance; and (2) to provide more service using less staff within the current funding level.

As of the initial measurement period, both goals were achieved. Test results indicated a significant improvement in indoor air quality (IAQ). Simultaneously, the FTE head count of janitorial staff was reduced by 25% from 160 to 120.

Scientific Study: The university environmental health and safety (EHS) department performed indoor air quality testing on five separate days during the second and third week of October 2011. The results of this baseline data were compared to results of the second testing of indoor air quality, which took place the last week of February 2012.

Comparative review of the data showed a significant reduction in airborne contaminants, including but not limited to dust, dust mites, dust mite feces, dead skin cells, fungal spores and mold spores. The reduction of 1.0 micron particles from October 2011 (43%) to March 2012 (24%) was 19%. The reduction of .3 micron particles from October 2011 (31%) to March 2012 (21 %) was 10%.

Results: The Cleaning for Health process improved indoor air quality by 19%. Simultaneously, the FTE head count of janitorial staff was reduced from 160 to 120, a 25% reduction for an estimated savings of more than $1.5 million to the university.

Considering that this new academic building opened in 2010, it is ideal to preserve the long-term value of this new property investment. However, the university believes that cleaning for health first has benefits regardless of the age or technical complexity of a building. The life expectancy of all building assets, such as carpet, hard floor surfaces, paint, computers, class room equipment, etc. is increased by cleaning for health.

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Direct and Indirect Costs of Chronic Disease

Paul Cagle
Best Practices, News

Businesses are a major provider of health insurance in the U.S., yet rising health care costs are making it increasingly difficult for employers to afford coverage. Employee health benefits are the fastest growing cost component for many employers and represent an increasingly large percentage of total work force costs.

The prevalence of chronic disease within the U.S. work force is a key source of these challenges. Not only does a sicker U.S. workforce have higher health care costs, but it is also less productive. Chronic disease leads to absenteeism and presenteeism – decreased productivity at work. These problems now cost U.S. businesses $1 trillion per year.

Direct and indirect costs of chronic disease

$1 Trillion Cost Chronic Disease

Absenteeism¹

Extensive work absence is associated with respiratory diseases:

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
3 weeks absent per year

Asthma
2.5 weeks absent per year

Allergies
1.2 weeks absent per year

Presenteeism²

According to the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, presenteeism is responsible for the largest share of lost economic output associated with chronic health problems. 21 percent of workers report that they have gone to work sick or burdened by a non-work issue six or more days in the last six months.

Family caregivers are a critical support structure for patients with a chronic illness. Family caregivers provide 80 percent of all long-term care services for chronically ill patients. In any given year, more than 50 million Americans find themselves in a caregiving role.

Employers pick up a large share of this cost when workers come to work sick, and when other workers are burdened by caring for a family member with chronic conditions.

The King’s cleaning for health reduces indoor air pollutants that contribute to respiratory chronic disease

In September 2009, the King’s completed a 90-day pilot project for a Houston-area medical clinic where a 31% reduction was documented in air particles down to 0.3 microns, including dust, dust mites, dust mite feces, dead skin cells, the H1N1 virus, fungal and mold spores, and harmful bacteria.

Armed with scientific data, The King’s employed a combination of work flow innovation and janitorial staff training to revolutionize the cleaning process in this medical clinic.

Read this Success Story.

 

¹Financial Forecast Center; CCH Unscheduled Absence Survey, 2007 (http://hr.cch.com)

²2009 Almanac of Chronic Disease, Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease (http://www.fightchronicdisease.org/sites/default/files/docs/2009AlmanacofChronicDisease_updated81009.pdf)

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